Math & Science: Counting Practice

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1 2 3 blocksCounting is a basic math skill that takes practice. Young children need repetition to learn numerical order, and will need to count even small numbers of objects. Here’s some simple, everyday ways to get practicing:

Do it __ times. Ask your child to do something a number times, such as clap their hands, stomp one foot, turn around, etc – while counting. Let your child ask the same of you. Make it more of a game by employing dice or a spinner to select the number.

Collect __ items. Repurpose containers such as empty jars or plastic cups/bottles and label each with a number. Ask your child to put the number of items in each container as corresponds to the number on the jar. Pennies work well for the objects assuming they do not pose a choking hazard.

Move __ spaces. Any game with a spinner or dice and a linear path. You could easily make your own with cards like “go forward 5 spaces,” “go back 4 spaces” and “lose one turn.”

Take __. This is good at snacktime with things like raisins, cheerios, or goldfish crackers. Start with a full bowl and an empty one. Using dice or a spinner (or cards with numerals), take that number of items from the and put it in the empty bowl (or straight into your mouth!)

Set the table for __. All the preschoolers I know love setting the table for dinner. Let them count out the plates, napkins, spoons, etc. according to how many people are eating.

Pancakes with __ blueberries. Make blueberry pancakes and count the number of blueberries in each one. Or, make them all with the same number except one or two and ask your child to discover your “mistake.” You could do this with chocolate chip cookies as well.

Counting is a basic math skill that takes practice. Young children need repetition to learn numerical order, and will need to count even small numbers of objects. Here’s some simple, everyday ways to get practicing: Do it __ times. Ask your child to do something a number times, such as clap their hands, stomp one foot,…

Counting is a basic math skill that takes practice. Young children need repetition to learn numerical order, and will need to count even small numbers of objects. Here’s some simple, everyday ways to get practicing: Do it __ times. Ask your child to do something a number times, such as clap their hands, stomp one foot,…

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